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  Monday, March 1, 2021
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Estonia's prime minister said Tuesday that his country does not need any border agreements with Russia
Estonia's prime minister said Tuesday that his country does not need any border agreements with Russia. Talks on border agreements between the countries have been deadlocked since Russia refused to ratify the document signed in 2005, citing new provisions inserted by Tallinn. "Of course, we would like relations between our countries to be more accurate and clear, which is why I advocate border treaties. But they have to be ratified by the Russian side. However, the absence of similar treaties is not a problem with the European Union, NATO or Schengen [countries]," Andrus Ansip said live on Radio 4. The two countries signed border agreements on May 18, 2005, and the Estonian parliament ratified the documents on June 20, but with additional demands linked to the 1920 peace treaty between Soviet Russia and Estonia. On September 6, Russia notified Estonia that it was revoking its signature from the treaties because the 1920 document was no longer valid. Moscow said the new provisions in the ratification law could be seen as legally entitling Estonia to make some territorial claims on Russia. Moscow proposed including a provision "that all the previously signed agreements and treaties in bilateral history outlining the border are invalid" in mid-2006, but Estonia replied that it had no intention of resuming negotiations. Ansip said cooperation between the two countries' border guards was one of the best examples of interaction, despite the absence of border agreements. He added that many countries lived in peace and harmony without such documents being signed. Until recently, border talks were also stalled with Estonia's neighbor, Latvia. A Latvian-Russian border treaty dating back to 1997 remains unsigned and un-ratified because Latvian politicians sought to link the border settlement to a declaration from Russia admitting Soviet aggression during World War II, as well as concessions on other issues. Latvia included a unilateral explanatory declaration to the draft border treaty, which allows it to claim Russian territory - the Pytalovo District in the Pskov Region - that was part of Latvia before World War II and was annexed by Russia in 1944. But Latvian Prime Minister Aigars Kalvitis said in January that his country would not attach any extra declarations to the treaty.
Print Estonia's prime minister said Tuesday that his country does not need any border agreements with Russia Bookmark Estonia's prime minister said Tuesday that his country does not need any border agreements with Russia

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