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  Thursday, September 24, 2020
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Military threats to Russia may come today both from industrially developed countries and military blocs created by them
Military threats to Russia may come today both from industrially developed countries and military blocs created by them, as well as from developing countries, General Yuri Baluyevsky, Chief of the General Staff of the Russian Armed Forces, has said at a meeting of the Academy of Military Sciences. The meeting was devoted to the structure and content of a new military doctrine of Russia. The text of his report appeared on the official site of the Russian Defence Ministry on Friday. “At present Russia, the same as any other country, has permanent (basic) national interests, whose foundation is made up of state sovereignty, territorial integrity, social-political stability in the system of the world community, as well as free access to vitally important economic and strategic zones and communications. I have to point out that it is those national interests of Russia, which are the key target of the so-called ‘new threats’ facing this country,” Baluyevsky said. According to his information, “the Defence Ministry formulated its notion of the threats to the military security of Russia, as well as the tasks for the Russian Armed Forces in a foreseeable perspective, on the basis of a comprehensive evaluation of the military-political and military-strategic situation in the world.” “In short, its conclusions boil down to the following: as a result of a perceptible weakening of the defence potential of Russia (in comparison with that of the Soviet Union), military threats to its security may come today both from industrially developed countries and military-political alliances created with their participation, as well as from the developing countries which have well-armed, well-trained and battleworthy armies. I think it is clear for all that one cannot ignore the military might of those countries, especially those which have territorial and other claims to Russia,” General Baluyevsky continued. He reminded that previously the Russian Armed Forces had been guided by the military doctrines, adopted in 1993 and 2000. “Unlike the main provisions of the 1993 doctrine, the 2000 military doctrine was re-orientated from the prevention of a war mostly by political means to the upholding of military security of Russia and the defence of its vital interests, using all means in the possession of the state. It is a document of a transitional period,” General Baluyevsky stressed.
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