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  Thursday, September 29, 2022
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Alexander Veshnyakov said it was unlikely that he would be pursuing a political career
Alexander Veshnyakov, chairman of Russia's Central Election Commission for eight years, said it was unlikely that he would be pursuing a political career. His first comments came two days after the president named his five representatives in the CEC. Veshnyakov was not on the list. Veshnyakov confirmed that several jobs had already been proposed to him, and that three proposals came from political parties. The CEC chairman whose office powers expire on March 26 also said he would land a job that suited him. "I'm not going to retire," he said. He declined to make comments on his work at the CEC. "I'm not out yet; and it's premature to sum up results. I'm still "a lame duck," as they say in politics," Veshnyakov said. On Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a decree appointing Igor Borisov, Stanislav Vavilov, Vasily Volkov, Maya Grishina and Igor Fyodorov his representatives in the Central Election Commission. The CEC is renewed every four years. The State Duma is represented by Valery Kryukov, Elvira Yermakova, Yevgeny Kolyushin, chairman of the house committee for mandates and deputies' ethics Gennady Raikov and lawmaker Vladimir Churov. The upper house's CEC representatives are Lyudmila Demyanchenko, Nikolai Konkin, Nina Kulyasova and Siyabshakh Shapiyev, whose powers have been extended. In addition, the FC delegated Yelena Dubrovina to the CEC who now represents the State Duma in this body. The new CEC will meet for its first session not later than April 2.
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