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  Friday, December 6, 2019
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The Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula is spewing a major ash column to a height of up to 6.5-seven kilometres above sea level
The Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula is spewing a major ash column to a height of up to 6.5-seven kilometres above sea level, there is no danger to nearby settlements, head of the Klyuchevskaya volcanic station Yuri Demyanchuk told Itar-Tass from the Klyuchi settlement (located 32 kilometres from the volcano) on Monday. He pointed out that on Sunday the giant mount spewed volcanic dust columns to a height of up to nine kilometres above sea level. “It is seen from Klyuchi today that the ash column is permanently above it,” the expert said. According to the scientist, the ash plume drifts away from the settlement with a population of about 5,000, but “a very small amount of ash” nevertheless falls there. Major incandescence is observed at nighttime above the volcano summit. Hot volcanic bombs are spewed from the crater every five-ten seconds. The spews height reaches 500 metres, Demyanchuk noted. According to him, several lava flows heated to 1,000 degrees Celsius are descending on the slopes. “At least three such flows are clearly visible,” the scientist said. The longest of them descended to the mark three kilometres above sea level. Lava is melting the glacier and water and mudflows are coming down the volcano slopes, but they pose no direct danger for the Klyuchi settlement. The volcano roar and explosions could be heard in this settlement. House windows were trembling from them. The so-called phreatic explosions occur when the hot lava with comes in contact with ice. Volcanic bombs are spewed from the crater to a height of up to 500 metres. The Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano is regarded the highest active volcano in Eurasia (4,750 metres above sea level). Its eruption started on February 15 and its activity has considerably grown since then, specialists pointed out. The giant mount spews ash clouds that spread in plumes to a distance of hundreds of kilometres. Last Tuesday, such a plume moving along an arc of a circle above the Bering Sea about 500 kilometres reached the Korf settlement in the Koryak Autonomous Area in the northern part of the Kamchatka Peninsula. The Klyuchevskaya Sopka usually erupts once in five-six years. The previous major eruption was registered in winter-spring 2005. Specialists are permanently monitoring the volcano. They believe the volcano presents no danger for nearby populated localities. Experts of the Kamchatka volcanic eruption response group said “there is a danger in the area of the volcano for international and local flights caused by possible ash and aerosol plumes.” All the organizations concerned have been warned about the hazard.
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