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  Tuesday, October 20, 2020
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The British version presuming that Andrei Lugovoi poisoned Alexander Litvinenko is inconsistent
The British version presuming that Andrei Lugovoi poisoned Alexander Litvinenko is inconsistent, Andrei Majorov, head of the investigating group into Litvinenko's case that is also investigating an attempt on the life of Dmitry Kovtun, said at a press conference in Moscow on Monday. "This version is vulnerable," he stressed. Polonium signs were found not only in places Lugovoi and Kovtun visited in London, but in different places where the two Russian businessmen had not been, Majorov said. This tendency was obvious during two visits by Lugovoi and Kovtun to London. There were no signs of Polonium in the office of businessman Shadrin. whom the two entrepreneurs met in London, and no Polonium signs were found in several restaurants and a night club that both Russian businessmen visited, Majorov said. The British version presumes that Polonium -210 was administered to Litvinenko in tea Lugovoi offered to Litvinenko on November 1, but both Lugovoi and Kovtun ordered the same tea for themselves, which shows that a version that Lugovoi was the source who administered poison is vulnerable, Majorov said. Another important thing overlooked is that both Lugovoi and Kovtun, who tested positive to Polonium found in their bodies, are also the victims. The investigation has been studying a version that Lugovoi and Kovtun might have been affected by Polonium emanated by Litvinenko, who might have been poisoned long before the three met in London, Majorov said. The Russian entrepreneurs are no better off than the other people affected by poison, while the presence of Alpha particles in places Lugovoi and Kovtun visited shows that both fell victim themselves, Majorov said. "It was not clear from the British documents what prompted the British conclusion that Lugovoi might have been a source of poisoning. Besides, the search for Polonium began only a month after Litvinenko died at a London hospital," Majorov said. The British investigators made rather a careful choice of the evidence collected, but they did not take into account the circumstances and information obtained on the Russian territory despite miserable information we have at present, Majorov said. "The documents provided by the British side are no evidence of Scotland Yard’s objective investigation into Litvinenko's case. In the framework of the Russian investigation and in order to find out where the Polonium came from an expert investigation is being made," Majorov said. "I will tell you no more because we have our own investigation secrets, " Majorov told the press conference.
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