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  Thursday, August 6, 2020
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Atomic experts of Great Britain, Norway and Russia has started checking the state of facilities that may pose radiation hazard in the Murmansk region
Atomic experts of Great Britain, Norway and Russia has started checking the state of facilities that may pose radiation hazard in the Murmansk region. One of them is the Nerpa ship-repair yard where decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines of the Northern Fleet are scrapped. Head of the delegation of English experts, British Minister of State for Energy Malcolm Wicks said he has been very impressed by technical equipment and professionalism of specialists of this enterprise. He said he personally attested this with pleasure. Norwegian Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Liv Monica Stubholt is also satisfied with the activity of the plant. She has been particularly impressed by unique pontoons for the transportation of decommissioned nuclear submarines that are being built here. The pontoons guarantee safety of towing of old nuclear submarines to scrapping sites. The Kola Peninsula is deservedly considered to be a place the most saturated with nuclear facilities in the world posing a serious ecological and radiation threat to the entire European North. Russia is incapable of getting rid of it on its own, therefore leading Western countries decided to provide assistance to its in disposal efforts. Great Britain and Norway are taking part in this work within the framework of the Global Partnership programme. Experts from these countries that arrived in Murmansk on Monday will be able to personally see not only the scale and complexity of the work, but also to make certain that money of English and Norwegian taxpayers are really used for its intended purpose, deputy head of the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom) Andrei Malyshev believes. On Tuesday, the experts will visit the world’s largest nuclear waste depository in the Andreyeva bay not far from the Russian-Norwegian border and at the Murmansk-based repair-technological enterprise Atomflot.
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