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  Tuesday, June 18, 2019
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Genetic analysis of what are believed to be the remains of the last Russian tsar's son and daughter will last at least three months
Genetic analysis of what are believed to be the remains of the last Russian tsar's son and daughter, discovered in the Urals in July, will last at least three months, an investigator said on Tuesday. "In late October, we plan to start genetic analysis of the remains, discovered on July 29 near Yekaterinburg. It will last at least three months," Vladimir Solovyov, a senior investigator with the Prosecutor General's Office said. Solovyov said examination of the remains, allegedly belonging to Tsar Nicholas II's son and heir Alexis, and daughter Maria, had so far produced inspiring results. "We can well expect that once all studies have been completed, the mystery of the last Russian emperor's missing family members will be solved," he said. In late July, the remains of a boy and a young woman were exhumed near Yekaterinburg, where the tsar, his wife, their four daughters and son, and several servants, were shot by the Bolsheviks in 1918. The crown prince and one of the princesses were believed to have been burnt and buried in a place away from the other nine bodies of the murdered Romanovs and their aides in a bid to cover up the scene. Solovyov said on Tuesday that bullets found near the remains appeared to have been shot from two pistols made in 1900 and 1903, and were similar to those discovered by the remains of the emperor, his wife and the other three daughters in 1991, when the Soviet Union broke up. Russia reopened an investigation into the execution of the Romanov family following the alleged discovery of the remains in late July. The investigation was dropped after the tsar and his family members' remains were authenticated and buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral in St. Petersburg in 1998, although forensic examination results have been challenged since then. The Russian Orthodox Church, which has canonized the murdered Romanov family, has called the 1998 burial "a political show."
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