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Over 8,000 people, including at least 1,500 civilians, were killed
Over 8,000 people, including at least 1,500 civilians, were killed in violence in Afghanistan in 2007, a new UN report said.

The report to be discussed by the UN Security Council on Wednesday said that in spite of "tactical successes by national and international military forces, the anti-government elements are far from defeated."

According to the report drafted by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, last year's violence was at the highest level since the U.S.-led invasion of the country against the Taliban in 2001.

Last year saw 160 suicide attacks and 68 assaults were prevented compared to 123 and 17 respectively, representing a 30% increase in attacks on 2006, as Taliban insurgents carried out more terrorist acts with approximately 566 violent incidents a month in 2007 compared with 425 in 2006.

Around 10% of the country (36 of 376 districts) are said to be a no-go areas for the government and aid workers, the report states.

The UN Secretary General expressed concern over the increased number of attacks targeting aid workers: "In over 130 attacks against humanitarian programs, 40

humanitarian workers were killed and 89 abducted, of whom seven were later killed by their captors."

The report, which comes amid growing pressure by the U.S. on its allies to send more troops to Afghanistan, also stated the coordination between Afghan and NATO personnel had improved.

Ban Ki-moon recommended another one-year extension of the UN mission in Afghanistan by the Security Council. The mission expires on March 23, 2008.


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