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  Saturday, August 24, 2019
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The crew of a Canadian submarine which was left drifting in the Atlantic for five days after a fire broke out on board were finally back on dry land last night
But the relief of the 54-strong crew of HMCS Chicoutimi at their safe arrival at Faslane in Scotland was marred by their grief for Lieutenant Chris Saunders, 32. Lt Saunders, who had two children, died from smoke inhalation after fire broke out on Tuesday, causing the 21-year-old submarine, which had just been bought from the Royal Navy, to partially lose power. A second crew member nearly died when he was swept overboard as rescuers battled to attach a tow line to the submarine but was rescued by a Royal Navy diver. Leading Diver Garth Spence, of the Northern Diving Group, based at Faslane, was among a team of divers who helped save the crew member, publishes the NEWS. According to the Guardian Unlimited, investigation of the cause of the fire on the submarine Chicoutimi begins in earnest today after its safe arrival at Faslane naval base on the Clyde yesterday. The Canadian submarine arrived in late afternoon towed by tugs and shadowed by British and Canadian navy vessels, ending a five-day ordeal for its 54 remaining crew. One died and two others were seriously injured in the fire which disabled the vessel and left it adrift in the Atlantic last Tuesday, three days after it had left Faslane for Canada. Yesterday the defence secretary, Geoff Hoon, said that the Chicoutimi, one of four nearly new submarines sold by the UK to Canada, was seaworthy and that the incident was not an embarrassment to Britain. "These boats were brought up to Royal Navy standards," he told BBC Radio 4's World this Weekend. "They had undergone rigorous trials and tests and, indeed, Canada has had the opportunity over very many years of surveying the boats, and obviously has been in negotiation with the United Kingdom during that period. So I think ... 'buyer beware' is absolutely accurate." Mr Hoon, who is due to meet the Canadian defence minister, Bill Graham, today, said he did not want relations with Canada, "an important friend and ally", to be soured by what had happened. An electrical fire crippled the HMCS Chicoutimi on Tuesday, leaving the diesel-powered submarine to drift in the Atlantic for days as British ships battled through rough weather to reach the vessel and rescue its 57 crew members. One officer died of injuries from the fire. Two other sailors were injured; the Irish hospital treating them said they would likely be discharged within the next few days. It was the submarine's maiden voyage under Canadian colors. The Chicoutimi is one of four secondhand subs the Canadian Navy bought from Britain. It set sail from Faslane on October 2 and had been expected to reach Halifax, Nova Scotia, by October 18. Britain's defense minister said Sunday that the vessel was in good condition when it was handed over to the Canadians, reports CNN
Print The crew of a Canadian submarine which was left drifting in the Atlantic for five days after a fire broke out on board were finally back on dry land last night Bookmark The crew of a Canadian submarine which was left drifting in the Atlantic for five days after a fire broke out on board were finally back on dry land last night

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