Logo
  Thursday, July 9, 2020
Sign-In  |  Sign-Up  |  Contact Us  |  Bookmark 

President Viktor Yushchenko's televised address on parliament dissolution has given
President Viktor Yushchenko's televised address on parliament dissolution has given the green light to a new election campaign, which immediately gathered speed, a testament to Ukrainian politicians' talent for campaigning.

Making lavish promises to the people and adding new candidates to election lists are simpler and much more pleasant endeavors than legislating laws or trying to implement them.

Besides, elections are an element of democracy. When political forces fail to agree, they appeal to the voters to judge them.

If this continues, Ukrainians will soon think that holding parliamentary elections on time is evidence of authoritarianism and dictatorship.

But the upcoming elections for Ukraine's parliament are not proof of democracy or social maturity. They mostly prove an authorities political illiteracy and inability to compromise, to coordinate positions with the other side, and to efficiently govern the country.

This means that Ukrainian society has no tools with which to influence its elites and nothing to use as an electoral instrument for creating a more acceptable power structure.

Given this level of irresponsibility, there can be no acceptable power structure in Ukraine, because the parties involved will inevitably start quarreling over seats and powers several months, if not weeks, after the elections.

Ukrainian authorities have more formidable problems they should address.

The country's crisis committee, made up of members of the government, the presidential secretariat, the opposition and the National Bank's board, should work round the clock to minimize the effects of the financial crisis and avoid budgetary losses due to the fall of metal prices on the Ukrainian market exchange and the inevitable increase in prices of Russian and Central Asian gas.

Ukrainian politicians should think of ways to cushion the consequences of the crisis for the country's poorest groups. Instead, they calmly agree to squander money on new elections, money that could be used to pay wages and pensions.

Where will they find the money for these payments now?

Empty-headedness is not democracy. Lighting your house on fire to burn down your opponents is not democracy. Doing everything possible and impossible to remain in power or to gain power is not democracy.

This is not democracy but the blatant disregard of the rich and successful for their less lucky compatriots. They have taught Ukrainians to vote, but for the elections to be effective, the elected leaders must learn to fulfill their commitments.

They must stop making empty promises and flinging accusations at each other, and instead learn to work to improve life in the country.

However, it appears that being true to one's commitments is not a trait of the Ukrainian political establishment.

The opinions expressed in this article are the author's and do not necessarily represent those of RIA Novosti.


Print President Viktor Yushchenko's televised address on parliament dissolution has given Bookmark President Viktor Yushchenko's televised address on parliament dissolution has given

Related News   
SepOctober 2008Nov
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
293012345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829303112
3456789