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  Thursday, October 29, 2020
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Women who smoke or are overweight substantially reduce their chances of getting pregnant by in vitro fertilization
In reproductive terms, the Dutch study found smoking adds 10 years to a woman's age, making it harder for her to conceive. For example, a 30-year-old woman who smokes has the same chance of getting pregnant by IVF as does a 40-year-old nonsmoker, according to the report published in the April issue of Human Reproduction. Braat's team collected data on 8,457 women who underwent IVF from 1983 to 1995. More than 40 percent smoked while undergoing their first attempt at IVF, and more than 7 percent were overweight. The researchers found that, compared with women who didn't smoke, those who did were 28 percent less likely to conceive and deliver an infant. And compared with normal weight women, overweight women were 33 percent less likely to have a baby, publishes Forbes. Forty three per cent of the women in the study were smokers who continued with the habit through their fertility treatment. The researchers found that the overall live birth rate for all the women was 15.2 per cent, and was highest for the women with unexplained subfertility, at 17.8 per cent. But the birth rate among women who smoked was 28 per cent lower than the overall average. The impact of tobacco use on successful IVF treatment was most apparent among women who had unexplained fertility problems, with only 13 per cent of the smokers having a live birth, compared with 20 per cent of the non-smokers. Women who smoked were also much more likely to have miscarriages. About 21 per cent lost their babies, compared with 16 per cent of non-smokers. Professor Didi Braat, one of the study authors, from Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, said: "Smoking has a devastating impact. It is comparable to adding a decade to the reproductive age of a 20-year-old. The researchers said that women undergoing fertility treatment could massively improve their chances of having a baby if they did not smoke and were of normal weight. More than a third of British women in their 20s smoke, and the rate has only decreased slightly in the past five years. One in seven couples experience problems in conceiving, and, in 20 per cent of cases involving female infertility, no specific cause can be found, informs Independent News
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