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  Monday, November 30, 2020
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The Food and Drug Administration has just approved a booster shot that will prevent adolescents from contracting whooping cough
The vaccine, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline will be added to the present booster shot given against tetanus and diphtheria which children now receive between the ages of 10 and 18. Whooping cough has been making a comeback of late. The disease is officially known as pertussis and is caused by a bacterial infection. Patients suffering from whooping cough often cough so hard they may break a rib. The name comes from the sound patients make when they are stricken with the disease and are gasping for air after coughing 15-20 times in a row. A vaccine is given to all children in the United States against whooping cough but a rise in the number of cases contracted by adolescents shows that the childhood vaccine wears off. The new booster shot should address that problem, informs Elitest Tv. According to Reuters, whooping cough is a highly contagious bacterial infection marked by severe coughing spells and a "whoop" sound when patients inhale. The disease can kill young children. Vaccines to provide immunity against whooping cough are routinely given to children, but experts believe immunity wanes by adolescence. While whooping cough can kill infants and children, the disease is milder in adults and teenagers. The cough can last for months in older patients, but it does not always produce the characteristic whooping sound. Older people who carry the bacteria can easily infect young, unvaccinated children, and reports of infant deaths from the disease have been increasing. Whooping cough cases peaked in the 1930s. Pertussis immunizations for infants and children up to age 7 were introduced in the United States in the 1940s. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were 18,957 pertussis cases reported in 2004, up from 10,670 in 2003. Boostrix was approved for use as a single-shot booster for young people ages 10 to 18, the Food and Drug Administration said in a statement. The vaccine should be available by June, GlaxoSmithKline spokeswoman Patricia Seif said. She said she could not disclose the price. Sanofi-Aventis is seeking FDA approval to sell a rival vaccine called Adacel to a larger group, people ages 11 to 64
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