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  Thursday, September 19, 2019
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A Ukrainian government formed by former allies in the "orange revolution" is unlikely to survive until fall
A Ukrainian government formed by former allies in the "orange revolution" is unlikely to survive until fall, a Russian political scientist said Monday. "An 'orange' government in Ukraine, which would comprise the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc, Our Ukraine bloc and the Socialist Party led by Oleksandr Moroz would be the least viable option," Gleb Pavlovsky, president of the Effective Policy Foundation, told a news conference. The three blocs would likely grow to hate each other and would split by autumn, Pavlovsky said. Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko's spokesman said earlier Monday that Yushchenko had called on the country's prime minister to start talks on creating a parliamentary coalition, even though official results of the vote are not expected until Tuesday. Tymoshenko, the president's flamboyant ally in the late 2004 "orange revolution" and an ex-prime minister, said Monday she intended to sign a memorandum establishing an "orange coalition" to include the three parties. Pavlovsky, however, suggested Tymoshenko was open to coalition talks with any party. "She is not tying her hands and is open to talks with any party, including the one led by [Viktor] Yanukovych. She might use him to secure more concessions from Yushchenko," Pavlovsky said. Yanukovych and his Party of Regions represent largely industrial and pro-Russian eastern Ukraine, and he was Yushchenko's main rival in the disputed presidential elections in late 2004. Latest preliminary reports have put the Party of Regions out in front. With 19.12% of the Sunday vote counted, Ukraine's Central Election Committee said Monday the Party of Regions was leading with 25.6% of the vote, followed by the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc (23.6%) and Our Ukraine Bloc with 17.22%. The Socialist Party has garnered 7.71% and the Communist Party 3.41%. In any event, Pavlovsky said the future government would largely conduct "reconnaissance" to assess the scale of economic problems facing the former Soviet republic and find finance to tackle them.
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